Last-Minute Holiday Gifts That Support LGBTQ Youth

Grab gifts for everyone on your list while supporting The Trevor Project! Each of these amazing partner brands is donating a portion of their proceeds to support our mission of saving young LGBTQ lives.

RompHim

Pride Collection

The RompHim Pride collection is the perfect way to show your pride and support Trevor’s programs while having a bit of romping good fun.

Shop now!

Sock Problems

Rainbow Pow

Sock Problems brings us these lovable rainbows that “Sock Hate!” Every purchase of Rainbow Pow doesn’t simply support your feet; it supports The Trevor Project as 25% of Rainbow Pow sales are donated back to our organization.

Shop now!

Rumpl

Pride Puffy Blanket

Whether indoors or outside, the Puffy blanket is designed to provide optimal warmth in any environment. Not only does this amazing blanket resist water, dirt, odor, pet hair, and other debris, but $5 from each blanket helps support Trevor’s life-saving programs!

Shop now!

Faherty

Rainbow Capsule Collection

Faherty’s Rainbow Sweater Poncho and matching beanie & scarf are unique, luxuriously soft, and super cozy for the holidays. 10% of all sales go back to The Trevor Project!

Shop now!


Holiday Self-Care Tips for LGBTQ Youth

Each year, we hear from LGBTQ young people that the holidays can be a particularly difficult time for them. The complicated relationships we have with our families can sometimes leave us feeling raw, overwhelmed, and upset during and after the holidays. Additionally, the time leading up to a holiday gathering can bring up anxiety as we think about how it might go. We know that it can be incredibly powerful to identify ways to support ourselves for if things get tough.

What’s a Self-Care Plan?

Self-care plans can look very different from one another — they’re just as diverse and unique as the people who use them! Before creating one, it is important to remember that whatever you are feeling is completely valid. You are not wrong for having your feelings, and you deserve to feel supported and loved for all that you are. Sometimes, though, we don’t get that love and support from the people who are supposed to love and support us. Self-care can be a way to love and support ourselves when we need it most.

Self-care can help us feel calmer, and it can give us a sense of control when things feel out of control. The best way to plan for this kind of self-support is to identify things that may be helpful or comforting for before, during, and after the holidays.

Self-Care Planning

Before, it can be helpful to find a friend or supportive adult to talk to about how you’re feeling. This can give us a clearer understanding of our fears and worries, and can help us identify what sorts of support we might need throughout the holidays. It is so powerful to know that we are not alone, that someone has our back, and is willing to listen. Also, if you know that someone will be at holiday gatherings who might be supportive of your identity, it might be helpful to talk with them beforehand if you are able to do so.

Self Care During the Holidays

As you enter a holiday gathering, it is important to remember that our identities are not contingent upon our family’s ability to understand or validate them. You know yourself best, you are the expert of yourself and your identity, and you are so incredibly valid. We know, though, that hearing this doesn’t change how difficult it can feel when the people around us aren’t showing us the acceptance and love that we deserve.

One thing that has been helpful for folks in the past is to create an affirmation to repeat in their head when they’re feeling anxious or upset. This can be very specific to your experience with specific comforting words or phrases, or it can be as simple as “I am valid,” or “I deserve to be supported and loved for who I am.” Additionally, it can be helpful to identify a friend who might be able to support you by texting you throughout, and to step away from family at any point to take care of yourself if you feel safe doing so — even if it’s just a quick walk outside or trip to the bathroom.

For transgender and gender non-conforming people who experience dysphoria (or for anyone whose physical expression is important to their identity), it can be great to get creative about the way that we affirm ourselves while with family. Folks have found it helpful to wear a piece of jewelry or clothing that feels affirming while around family. This can be something that is visible to others if that’s safe for you, or it can be something you wear under your clothing (like a necklace, a cool pair of socks, an undergarment, or a cute t-shirt!) so that only you know that it’s there.

Post-Holiday Self-Care

It can also be important to plan for the self-care we might need after the holidays. This may be talking with someone who is supportive and understanding, watching a favorite TV show, creating some art, writing about your holiday experience, taking a cozy bubble bath, or doing something else that makes you feel comforted. A lot of LGBTQ people find it affirming to watch LGBTQ YouTubers or read their blogs when they’re feeling upset or alone, as it helps us to remember that there are people out there who are just like us.

The Trevor Project is Here for You 24/7

The reality is that some LGBTQ young people will spend the holidays with family; and for others, the holidays are a reminder of the loss of and the rejection from their families. Homelessness, violence, and suicidal thoughts affect LGBTQ youth uniquely and profoundly, and the holidays can be particularly difficult while alone.

Regardless of our relationship to the holidays, creating a self-care plan can be a powerful way to show ourselves the love we deserve. If you need additional support, please know that Trevor is always here for you 24/7. You can reach out to our caring and compassionate counselors through our Lifeline, Chat, and Text programs to talk about anything you are going through — you might even want to consider making Trevor a part of your self-care plan!

Joie A. DeRitis, LMSW (she/her/hers)
Senior Trainer
The Trevor Project


The Trevor Project Joins Leading Civil Rights Groups on Amicus Brief Supporting Federal Hate Crimes Legislation

The Trevor Project, together with The Matthew Shepard Foundation, Freestate Justice, Lambda Legal, and the Anti-Defamation League have signed on to an amicus brief to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in defense of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act (HCPA).

Since 2009, the HCPA has allowed the federal government to prosecute crimes motivated by a victim’s sexual orientation or gender identity as hate crimes, so long as those crimes had an effect on interstate commerce. Unfortunately, a District Court in Virginia recently overturned the conviction of an individual who admitted to viciously attacking his coworker because he thought he was gay, on the theory that “bias-motivated violence” is categorically “noneconomic” — even when the attack literally happened at an Amazon.com facility while the victim was simply doing their job, preparing to ship a package across state lines.

If allowed to stand, this narrow and clearly inappropriate interpretation would effectively erase important and groundbreaking federal protections for LGBTQ people. Hate-motivated violence against the LGBTQ community is a serious national problem, and one that LGBTQ youth worry about and discuss with us every day. In 2017, law enforcement agencies reported nearly 1,500 hate crimes motivated by gender, gender identity, or sexual orientation bias, a sharp increase over previous years — and those are just the crimes that were reported.

LGBTQ youth deserve to know that the law protects them in the strongest possible terms, which is why The Trevor Project is proud to stand with a powerful alliance of civil rights and anti-violence groups in defense of this important law. We are especially grateful to Freestate Justice for coordinating this brief.

“As we know from our work with our clients, LGBT people, in large part because the systemic and sometimes violent discrimination they encounter at work, experience poverty at disproportionately high rates. Although FreeState has worked hard to make sure that our Maryland state hate crimes law includes sexual orientation and gender identity, Matthew Shepard’s and James Byrd, Jr.’s law makes sure that protection extends to LGBT people and other vulnerable communities in all fifty states. The law carefully ensures that those who commit a hate crime in the workplace are held accountable; there is no doubt it was constitutionally applied here.” said Jennifer L. Kent, Managing Attorney, FreeState Justice.


The Trevor Project Hosts Star-studded Trevorlive Los Angeles Gala

Ryan Murphy, Amandla Stenberg, Emma Roberts, Lauren Jauregui, Ty Dolla $ign, cast of POSE, Jussie Smollett, Deborah Cox and More Show Their Support

Los Angeles — The Trevor Project hosted its 2018 TrevorLIVE Los Angeles gala at The Beverly Hilton where it honored Emmy®, Golden Globe® and Peabody® Award-winning screenwriter, producer and director Ryan Murphy and the cast of “POSE;” Amandla Stenberg; and AT&T. Eugene Lee Yang hosted the event which helped raise over $1.5 million and included performances by Lauren Jauregui, Deborah Cox, and a surprise performance by POSE castmates Billy Porter, Mj Rodriguez, and Our Lady J. Additional attendees included Brad Goreski, Cameron Esposito, Cary Deuber, Charlayne Woodard, Cobie Smulders, Dan Levy, Dominique Jackson, Dyllon Burnside, Emma Roberts, Hailie Sahar, Gia Gunn, Indya Moore, James Van Der Beek, Jason Collins, Jussie Smollett, LeeAnne Locken, Mara Wilson, Madame LaQueer, Miles McKenna, Morgan McMichaels, Nico Santos, Ongina, Ryan Jamaal Swain, Steven Canals, Kylie Sonique Love, and Ty Dolla $ign.

The Trevor Project is the world’s largest organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people. TrevorLIVE LA is the organization’s annual star-studded signature fundraiser.

Highlights from the event included:

  • Lauren Jauregui kicked off the show with a stripped-down performance of her debut single, “Expectations.”
  • The host of the evening Eugene Lee Yang welcomed the crowd applauding The Trevor Project’s tireless work and service to the LGBTQ community. “It is an absolute privilege to support The Trevor Project, the world’s largest suicide prevention and crisis intervention organization for LGBTQ young people,” he said. “Tonight, we are honoring some truly awe-inspiring trailblazers for the LGBTQ community.”
  • The Trevor Project’s CEO & Executive Director Amit Paley took to the stage. “There are people in this room who’ve told me that they wouldn’t be here today if it weren’t for this organization, and I know there are others who wish they had known about Trevor in THEIR darkest moments,” he said. “That is why we are here today. To make sure that every young person, regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identity, race, religion, or immigration status, knows that The Trevor Project is here for them whenever they need us.”
  • Amandla Stenberg accepted the Youth Innovator Award and reflected on coming out in the public eye. “Often times who we are is postulated in the context of pain, shame, and tragedy,  and although that may be a facet of our experiences I do not feel that it is by any means the totality of them or how I experience being gay,” they said. “I find that understanding so limiting and inaccurate when I know that if anything we are the opposite; we are joy and light. We are the sacred unraveling of damaging fabrications who reveal the power of truth through love. We are unapologetic expressions of divinity and exuberance.”
  • Jussie Smollett presented the 20/20 Visionary Award to AT&T’s Mobility & Entertainment President David Christopher, who accepted the award on the organization’s behalf. “When we first started our work with The Trevor Project, we set out together to do something meaningful. So, we threw our support behind outreach efforts to expand a platform that helps The Trevor Project achieve 24/7 text and chat services to help even more youth in crisis.”
  • Janet Mock presented the Hero Award to Ryan Murphy and the cast of “POSE.” Murphy accepted the award and stated, “When I was 19, in Indiana, I myself called a suicide hotline. Overwhelmed by the AIDs crisis, by the fact that I was the only ‘out’ person in my friend group, the only ‘out’ person I knew at the time, and alienated from my family, I felt profound despair. I made a call one late night in November. I made a connection, got some hope, and carried on. It’s powerful life saving work this organization does. In my round about way, I know this first hand.” He ended his speech announcing a $50,000 donation to The Trevor Project. The full transcript is available here.
  • Deborah Cox closed out the show with a rousing rendition of her No. 1 hit “Nobody’s Supposed to Be Here” and a cover of Whitney Houston’s classic hit, “I Wanna Dance With Somebody.”

The proud presenting sponsor of this year’s TrevorLIVE LA is AT&T. In addition, Toyota served as the official Red Carpet Reception sponsor, Kimpton Hotels and Restaurants as the official hotel partner, and Three Olives® Vodka as the official spirits sponsor.

Use the following links to access photos and video from the event

PHOTO

Credit: Getty on behalf of The Trevor Project

VIDEO

# # #

About The Trevor Project

The Trevor Project is the world's largest suicide prevention and crisis intervention organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer & questioning (LGBTQ) young people. The Trevor Project offers a suite of 24/7 crisis intervention and suicide prevention programs, including TrevorLifelineTrevorText, and TrevorChat as well as the world’s largest safe space social networking site for LGBTQ youth, TrevorSpace. Trevor also operates an education program with resources for youth-serving adults and organizations, an advocacy department fighting for pro-LGBTQ legislation and against anti-LGBTQ rhetoric/policy positions, and a research team to discover the most effective means to help young LGBTQ people in crisis and end suicide. If you or someone you know is feeling hopeless or suicidal, our trained crisis counselors are available 24/7 at 1-866-488-7386 via chat www.TheTrevorProject.org/Help, or by texting START to 678678.

Press Contacts

Michael Samonte | Ulisses Rivera | Samuel Yu
Sunshine Sachs
323-822-9300
[email protected]

Kevin Wong
The Trevor Project
646-576-7044
[email protected]