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Here for one generation, here for the next

For 25 years, The Trevor Project has been providing community and support for LGBTQ young people who need it.  We’ve come a long way over the past 25 years; in 1994, a short film called Trevor was released, telling the fictional story of a 13-year-old gay boy who grapples with bullying, family rejection, and suicidal thoughts. The film went on to win the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film, but the creators soon discovered there was no real place for LGBTQ young people experiencing similar struggles to call for support. The Trevor Project was officially founded on March…
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Opening Books For LGBTQ Young People

I became obsessed with books and writing at an early age. My favorite books as a child included “Esperanza Rising” by Pam Muñoz Ryan, as it was one of the few books that depicted a Mexican story. I was able to see parts of myself and my history in Esperanza, and later, I found myself in volumes of manga, 300-page fantasy novels, slam poetry and Greek mythology. This is what fostered my love of literature: to recognize myself in the magical wizard, the curious monster, the brave hero in the story. This is how I fell in love with words,…
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Authors Making a Difference: Celebrating Women’s History Month with a Panel of Women and Gender-Expansive Authors

Seeing ourselves in stories can be incredibly powerful. The Trevor Project’s editorial team invited three authors — Lamya H, Sarah Cypher, and Becky Albertalli — to talk about the importance of seeing women’s and LGBTQ+ experiences in books, and how they can help us better understand ourselves and be better allies to each other. Considering recent bans of LGBTQ+ books in school libraries, these authors show us why sharing authentic stories can help affirm young people and why reading mainstream LGBTQ+ books can be an act of resistance. Lamya H (she/they) is a queer Muslim writer and organizer living in…
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Being There For LGBTQ+ Young People With Disabilities

An estimated 3 to 5 million LGBTQ+ people in the United States have disabilities. It would be wrong, then, to assume that someone’s disability could dictate their gender or sexuality. Still, as we enter Developmental Disability Awareness Month, we encounter a lot of stigma and misinformation surrounding LGBTQ+ young people who have a disability (or more).  First, let's talk about what a disability is. A disability can be defined as a physical, mental, cognitive, or developmental condition that impairs, interferes with, or limits a person's ability to engage in certain tasks or participate in typical daily activities and interactions. But…
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What Supporting Black LGBTQ Young People Really Looks Like

Being Black is hard. Due to the unique historical and current systems of oppression we face, the simple feat of continuing to exist and thrive in this country is an act of sheer rebellion for Black people. Countless scholars have illustrated myriad challenges to physical and mental health that Black people face, all stemming from systematic discrimination and racism. Mental health care providers and researchers alike have long been sounding the alarm about the mental health crisis among Black young people, specifically pointing to increasing rates of suicide. Still, in many ways reflective of our tenacity, Black people are incredibly…
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Celebrating Aromantic Spectrum Awareness Week

Aromantic Spectrum Awareness Week is a great opportunity for all of us (aromantic or otherwise) to learn more about aromanticism, and to dust off any cobwebs of misconception around what it means to be aromantic. It’s important to define what it means to be aromantic: Aromanticism is a romantic orientation that describes people who do not experience romantic attraction. This does not mean that aromantic people do not experience any kind of attraction at all; they may still experience platonic, aesthetic, or sensual attraction. Being aromantic is not a choice, like any other orientation. Aromantic people are perfect exactly as…
Jae Rice
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Making Brave Spaces For Black LGBTQ Young People

Brave Space Alliance, the first Black trans-lead LGBTQ center in Chicago, was born on a March evening in 2017 during the Trans Liberation March in Chicago’s city center, which at the time was the largest demonstration for trans rights in the history of the Midwest. Now, Brave Space’s focus is on providing culturally equitable resources to Black, Indigenous, and Brown trans folks and operate several programs including identity-based support groups, gender-affirming resources, and mutual aid. Their work is sustained by dedicated activists, fixtures in the ballroom scene, and people engulfed in Chicago’s queer Black community.  Their critical services reach the…
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Strut Your Strengths For The Trevor Project’s 25th Anniversary

Our community has grown so much over the past 25 years. Together, we have built a network of people dedicated to supporting LGBTQ young people, advocating for their rights, and making sure the world becomes a better place for them. Every person in this growing community of care has unique strengths and passions, whether that’s dancing, pottery, advocacy, running, or reading. Join us in celebrating each other and Trevor’s 25th Anniversary in our 25 Minute Strut Your Strengths Facebook Challenge! This virtual fundraising challenge is all about what makes you special — and raising funds for The Trevor Project while…
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The National League Of Cities Is Making Change For LGBTQ Young People

At The Trevor Project, we provide crisis services to LGBTQ young people whenever and wherever they need us. We know that LGBTQ young people are vulnerable to mental health challenges and are at increased risk for suicide because of how they are mistreated in society and often by those closest to them at home, at school, and in their communities. We are working diligently to change that. Still, even as we work to support the LGBTQ young people who need us, there are some things that we can't necessarily provide, but that every person deserves like housing, food, safety and…
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What Is Intersectionality, Really?

We can start with one definition: intersectionality is the way in which individuals are empowered and oppressed by the intricate ways in which parts of their identities connect. Every single person is unique; a person’s identity isn’t just made up of their race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, religion, class, ability, nationality, or even location in the world, but the combination of these things and more. Think of it as a gemstone that has many sides each appearing as you rotate it in your hand. Every single side you see reveals different angles of the stone’s face, but they all connect, creating…