Young People Find Community on a Fundraising Page for Trevor

A few months ago, The Trevor Project learned that many viewers of the CW’s TV show “The 100” were upset about a storyline that presented a lesbian character in an unfavorable way.  After two seasons of a storyline that built up to a possible relationship with bisexual character Clarke, the lesbian character Lexa was killed, as part of the plotline, which left several viewers with feelings of loss and disappointment.

One person, Gina Tass, a behavioral therapist, saw that these young people needed a place to process their feelings in a healthy way, so she created the Leskru fundraising page for The Trevor Project that could serve as a safe space where they could voice their opinions, make an impact together, and not feel alone. On March 6, 2016, The Trevor Project was pleasantly surprised to see donations flood in in an effort to turn this negative television moment into something truly positive.

With over 4100 donations, ranging from one dollar to several thousand, including a matched contribution from Zimbio, the LGBT Fans Deserve Better™ movement has raised over $155,000, showing that there is power in bringing our collective voices together. Actress Alycia Debnam-Carey (Lexa) reported to the Daily Beast that she is proud her character’s storyline has inspired activism: “Just to think that it had such an impact on people…It’s kind of an honor…It became a positive thing, which is really the most important thing about it all.”

The Trevor Project is here 24/7 for all youth who are hurting at 1-866-488-7386 and thetrevorproject.org. The safe supportive online community TrevorSpace.org has over 140,000 members who are looking for connection—connection similar to the type that the Leskru donors have found on just one fundraising page for Trevor. “We thank all Leskru donors who have given a voice to not only the lifesaving work of The Trevor Project, but also the LGBTQIA community as a whole,” says Abbe Land, CEO and Executive Director of The Trevor Project.

For Suicide Prevention Month, consider joining the Leskru community at https://give.thetrevorproject.org/fundraise?fcid=625415.

[LGBT Fans statement] We want to thank all of the amazing individuals who have responded to the LGBT Fans initiatives. With our latest project, we’ve managed to promote the Pledge for better representation on television, as well as push our total amassed funds for Trevor, past the $155,000 mark. We feel that the Trevor Project is in a unique position to understand the impact of how LGBTQ people are represented in the media, due to their daily interaction with LGBTQ youth, many of whom are struggling with loss and who are looking for connections and role models, and as such believe that this is a good match. We hope new and old supporters alike will continue to join us in the fight for better LGBTQIA characters and storylines in the media, as well as our projects to raise funds for Trevor and suicide prevention.

To learn more about LGBT Fans Deserve Better™ and our initiatives please visit:
http://lgbtfansdeservebetter.com
and
http://wedeservedbetter.com/


The Trevor Project’s Annual Report: Together, Saving Young LGBTQ Lives

 

The Trevor Project is pleased to present fiscal year 2015’s Annual Report. This year’s Annual Report highlights some of the many amazing people who have generously dedicated their time, energy, and support to helping us save young LGBTQ lives, day in and day out. In addition, it includes a summary about our financials and the impact of our programs.

Thanks to the support of many of you, we continue our fight to create a brighter future where the possibilities and opportunities are the same for all youth, regardless of gender or sexuality. This past year The Trevor Project has impacted the lives of over 200,000 people through our crisis services, prevention programs, education, social media, and awareness campaigns.

The impact we have will only grow as we change the lives of more and more young people in the years to come. Thanks for everything you do to contribute to this valuable lifesaving work!


NY State Bans Conversion Therapy

As one of the national leaders in advocacy and policy change for LGBTQ youth, The Trevor Project applauds the Governor Cuomo Administration for making bold efforts to end conversion therapy–a practice grounded in homophobia, transphobia, and discrimination.

Abbe Land, Executive Director and CEO of The Trevor Project expressed support and gratitude for Governor Cuomo’s efforts to end conversion therapy in New York.

The Trevor Project has been on the forefront of fighting against the harmful results of conversion therapy for years. We need and encourage all people who have the power to ban this practice, which can cause a lifetime of damage to the youth we serve, to stand up and take action.

The Trevor Project has continued to work with political leadership and decision makers to help structure the ban that has taken place in California, New Jersey, and Washington D.C. We are pleased that Governor Cuomo has taken action to add New York to this list.

As an organization, The Trevor Project offers support to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth (LGBTQ) who face so much intolerance, prejudice, and even hate mongering. The reality that someone can be placed in conversion therapy as a way to “change” their authentic selves can increase a young person’s risk for self-harm or possible cases of suicide.

The causes of suicide are complicated, but we know that over 41% of trans people have reportedly attempted suicide, and LGB youth are four times as likely to attempt suicide than their straight peers. This is happening in our country, right now. We have to take steps to protect these youth, and help save lives nationwide.

There is virtually no credible evidence that any type of psychotherapy can change a person’s sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, and, in fact, conversion efforts pose critical health risks to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, including depression, shame, decreased self-esteem, social withdrawal, substance abuse, risky behavior, and suicidality. Nearly all the nation’s leading mental health associations, including the American Psychiatric Association, the American Psychological Association, the American Counseling Association, the National Association of Social Workers, and the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy have examined conversion efforts and issued cautionary position statements on the utilization of these practices.

The Trevor Project continues to work closely with other policy makers and organizations around the nation to talk to and provide information about the detrimental results of conversion therapy on LGBTQ youth. We see a future where conversion therapy is banned throughout the nation and our youth are allowed to grow and live as their authentic selves.


How to Build Resiliency in 2016

As the new year begins, you may be thinking of making new year’s resolutions, which can be a daunting process. Here are ways you can build resiliency and community during 2016 so that you take care of yourself while making commitments or changes throughout 2016:

1. Take note of the good things happening in your life, daily. Instead of making new year’s resolutions, try making a “rememberlutions” jar or box. Whenever anything happens that makes you proud (or happy) in 2016, write it down and put it in the jar or box. It doesn’t matter how big or small the memory is; it just matters that you had it!

2. Write down what you hope to accomplish in your day, each morning. Whether it’s doing one assignment or volunteering with your favorite nonprofit, making a plan for your day-to-day can ease any anxiety about what’s to come throughout your week. If you’re having a hard day, it’s always nice to look at those goals at the end of your day and reflect on what you’ve accomplished. Even if you don’t accomplish much, having tasks to stay productive can be gratifying.

3. Start taking action in ways that better not only your health, but also the health of others. Create a self-care regimen and involve your friends. Have regular meet-ups to make art, write, hike, run, or exercise at a park. Doing fun activities in groups can help you feel less isolated.

4. Become an ally. Whether you identify as LGBTQIA, straight, cisgender, or some combination of any of the above, it’s important to show regular support for the LGBTQIA community at large. Being an ally for other races within the LGBTQIA community, as well as other identities, is a great way to build inclusivity and stay informed. It may also inspire you to become a leader and start your own LGBTQIA group, which can help you connect not only with others, but also to yourself!

5. Educate yourself regularly.  There is always new information to learn about within the LGBTQIA community. Follow resources on social media so that you can be aware of what issues impact you, and how you can be a part of the community. Here are some resources you can follow:

Whatever way you build resiliency in 2016, know that we are always here for you and we are a source of support 24/7 at 1-866-488-7386. You can also find helpful resources at TrevorSpace.org, and thetrevorproject.org. Trevor is sending you strength this new year.


Self-Care During The Holiday Season

While it is always very important to recognize and appreciate happiness during the holidays, we must also take some time to be mindful of the difficulties that come for many LGBTQ folks during this time of the year. Some folks coming home acknowledging their gender identity or sexuality for the first time to their families or friends may struggle with the coming out process and may face adversity.  Consider these tips when needing support this holiday season:

1) Check  in on loved ones and friends who are affirming of your identity. Folks who do not have affirming networks, or may be in recovery, or coping with mental health issues, need compassion and support. Surround yourself with folks you are comfortable being around, whether it’s through a phone call, text messages, and/or hangouts, online or in person. Checking in on your friends is a great way to make sure that you stay connected to yourself and your community.

2) Make a self-care plan. Make a list of what your  triggers are and set personal boundaries before you visit your family or friends, as well as a list of ideas that calm you down. This list of ideas can include making a comfort box containing things that help you calm down, eating comfort food, getting sleep, putting off homework, crying, rescheduling plans, reading a good book, watching TV, or doing nothing at all. Feeling your feelings is healthy. Keep some positive affirmations on hand that you can turn to when you need a reminder that you’re doing the best you can if you’re struggling. This self-care list can also contain phone numbers and names of people that support you (make sure that our Lifeline, 1-866-488-7386, is on your list). We are here 24/7, even on the holidays, so you are never alone and will always be supported no matter where you are.

3) Practice talking about your identity to a friend before you visit your family. In the case you  may want to start having a conversation with your family about your pronouns or sexuality, practice talking about how you want to be treated. Expressing that you have an affection for the same sex, other genders, or none at all, or that you want to be called by a certain pronoun can be very empowering, but it may not always be respected, so if you need to walk away from any toxic conversations regarding your identity, that’s okay. You can always call us if you need support during that time.

4) Remember that you deserve love and support. Whether you decide to step away from a holiday party because you are feeling overwhelmed, deciding to go to a friend’s house to be in a more supportive space, or if you are feeling suicidal, know that you are loved, you are worthy of compassion, and we are so thankful for you. You matter.

5) Keep a few resources at hand that you can turn to for support.

We love and accept all identities and during the holiday season, we’re here for you 24/7 at 1-866-488-7386. Find a supportive online community at TrevorSpace.org and helpful resources at thetrevorproject.org.


Help Save Young Lives This New Year

 

While we prepare for 2016, all of us at The Trevor Project are taking a moment to say thank you for making our lifesaving work possible. As 16-year-old Kim told us a few months ago, “I honestly am so thankful for The Trevor Project. You saved my life. Thanks to whomever answered the phone and helped me. I will always be grateful.”

For the young person who feels “different” and is reaching out for help, The Trevor Project is transformative. Because of your support, young people like Kim who were helped or motivated by our work can now help spread the word about our programs, which will forward our mission to end suicide for all LGBTQ youth.

Will you help us continue to be there by making a tax-deductible donation to The Trevor Project before December 31? Your support shows LGBTQ young people that they matter, they’re not alone, and they’ll always have a place to get help when in crisis.

Let’s ensure young LGBTQ people like Kim always have The Trevor Project to reach out to. Together, let’s create a future in which the possibilities are the same for all youth, regardless of gender identity or sexuality. We wish you a happy new year, and look forward to making more progress and change in 2016. Thank you again for helping us create a brighter future for all.

Please consider joining one of our monthly giving programs at thetrevorproject.org/donate today to further your impact on improving the lives of LGBTQ youth.


Corporate Spotlight: Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants

For over two years, Kimpton has been an invaluable partner of The Trevor Project, from helping produce fundraising events, to providing hospitality to those who help forward our mission to end suicide among all LGBTQ youth. Kimpton’s consistent support is an extension of founder Bill Kimpton’s desire to support crisis intervention and AIDS awareness among the LGBTQ community.  Committed to creating a culture of inclusion, Kimpton has worked with The Trevor Project to engage with the LGBTQ community, and we are incredibly grateful.

Sharing ideals of caring and compassion towards LGBTQ youth, Kimpton supports our vision for a brighter LGBTQ future. Through social media, they’ve acknowledged the importance of National Coming Out Day, World Mental Health Day, and Spirit Day, in which they rallied all employees to don purple for GLAAD’s bullying prevention campaign. Most importantly, they’ve helped raise a total of $25,000 for The Trevor Project through the Cirque Du Pride Party in San Francisco with MC Margaret Cho, and the Orange Party with GLEE actors, MC Kevin McHale and performer Alex Newell.

Kimpton’s employment programs also reinforce their belief in a brighter future for LGBTQ youth. With their employee resource group, KPRIDE, they’ve coordinated regular outreach to the LGBTQ community and they were the first hotel company to score 100 percent on the HRC Corporate Equality Index in 2004. In 2011, they received the “HRC Innovation Award for Workplace Equality” for their pioneering benefits programs, including transgender-inclusive, fully-insured employee health plans and grossed up employees’ incomes to offset taxes from domestic partner benefits. They also celebrated the landmark June 26 Supreme Court ruling with a custom-created video illustrating the history of same-sex marriage across the U.S. And, with employees involved in many facets of The Trevor Project partnership, Kimpton continues its legacy of employee-driven philanthropy.


The Trevor Project looks forward to continuing the relationship with Kimpton, and we are excited for our upcoming events at their hotels, including the New York volunteer appreciation party, Trevor Gives Thanks, and our inaugural cocktail reception in Chicago. With Kimpton’s generosity and dedication to Trevor’s mission, we have been able to work together to spread awareness about volunteering and fundraising opportunities so that we can continue our efforts to save young lives.


Trevor Gives Thanks

During this season of thanks, we reflect on the immense amount of gratitude we have for everyone who continues to make our lifesaving work possible. From our board members and donors, to our volunteers and staff, we recognize that it’s because of all of you that LGBTQ youth know they can always reach out to The Trevor Project, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

For you to truly understand how much you mean to Trevor, we thought it would be best to share messages from the youth we’ve served, including one young person who said…

“When no one else understands or is willing to talk about the hard stuff, I always know I can turn to The Trevor Project. You’ve helped me so much. Thank you.”

With hundreds of thousands of youth who rely on The Trevor Project as the one place they can reach out to, we are grateful that over the last 17 years, with your support, we have been able to grow from a 24/7 phone line to a comprehensive suicide prevention and crisis intervention program, including a lifeline, text and chat services, and an online community now serving 200,000 youth annually.

We couldn’t meet youth where they are at without our over 1,000 volunteers, from our crisis counselors, to those who are doing outreach in communities across the nation. Together, they are the backbone of our mission to end suicide for all LGBTQ youth and we can’t thank them enough for their dedication and passion. After one crisis call, a young person told us…

“Today, I decided it’s OK to be who I am. You helped me realize that. Thank you so much.”

When we think about youth who do not feel they can live as their authentic selves, especially in rural areas of the South, we are grateful for our donors and board members who are helping us innovate our programs so that we can connect with youth who may not know we exist.

As we gear up for TrevorLIVE on December 6, we look forward to being able to thank many of you in person. Our invaluable connections with donors, board members, staff, and volunteers could not be possible without our sponsors and partners. It’s because of all of you that we can put all our focus towards youth who tell us to “Please keep saving lives.”

At the end of the day, it’s not just one person who makes The Trevor Project’s work possible. All of you are contributing to our vision of a brighter future for all LGBTQ youth. With you, The Trevor Project is not only saving young lives, but also changing them. As one young person has said…

“I just want to thank everyone at The Trevor Project for all you have done for me. I wouldn’t be here without you amazing people. Now I’m living life. Happy.”

This season, remember that The Trevor Project exists because of all of you, and we are forever thankful, as are all of the LGBTQ youth we serve.


Trevor Gives Thanks

During this season of thanks, we reflect on the immense amount of gratitude we have for everyone who continues to make our lifesaving work possible. From our board members and donors, to our volunteers and staff, we recognize that it’s because of all of you that LGBTQ youth know they can always reach out to The Trevor Project, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

For you to truly understand how much you mean to Trevor, we thought it would be best to share messages from the youth we’ve served, including one young person who said…

“When no one else understands or is willing to talk about the hard stuff, I always know I can turn to The Trevor Project. You’ve helped me so much. Thank you.”

With hundreds of thousands of youth who rely on The Trevor Project as the one place they can reach out to, we are grateful that over the last 17 years, with your support, we have been able to grow from a 24/7 phone line to a comprehensive suicide prevention and crisis intervention program, including a lifeline, text and chat services, and an online community now serving 200,000 youth annually.

We couldn’t meet youth where they are at without our over 1,000 volunteers, from our crisis counselors, to those who are doing outreach in communities across the nation. Together, they are the backbone of our mission to end suicide for all LGBTQ youth and we can’t thank them enough for their dedication and passion. After one crisis call, a young person told us…

“Today, I decided it’s OK to be who I am. You helped me realize that. Thank you so much.”

When we think about youth who do not feel they can live as their authentic selves, especially in rural areas of the South, we are grateful for our donors and board members who are helping us innovate our programs so that we can connect with youth who may not know we exist.

As we gear up for TrevorLIVE on December 6, we look forward to being able to thank many of you in person. Our invaluable connections with donors, board members, staff, and volunteers could not be possible without our sponsors and partners. It’s because of all of you that we can put all our focus towards youth who tell us to “Please keep saving lives.”

At the end of the day, it’s not just one person who makes The Trevor Project’s work possible. All of you are contributing to our vision of a brighter future for all LGBTQ youth. With you, The Trevor Project is not only saving young lives, but also changing them. As one young person has said…

“I just want to thank everyone at The Trevor Project for all you have done for me. I wouldn’t be here without you amazing people. Now I’m living life. Happy.”

This season, remember that The Trevor Project exists because of all of you, and we are forever thankful, as are all of the LGBTQ youth we serve.


How To Join Our Community of Donors

In the last month, we’ve had fundraising events all over the country, bringing together supporters of our life-saving services. It’s been wonderful seeing our community in person, bonding over how they participate in what we do. We are incredibly grateful for all of our supporters and could not continue our suicide prevention and crisis intervention work without them.

To gear up for TrevorLIVE LA, our annual fundraiser held on December 6, we threw Trevor Gives Thanks, a small get-together of donors and volunteers at Bugatta to build community around those who will be sponsoring, offering services, and working at our Los Angeles event. In New York, we launched our new major donor program, Impact Circle, bringing together new and long-standing supporters to pledge gifts of $1,200 or greater at the New York office of international PR firm, Edelman. And, at Kimpton’s Palomar Hotel in San Diego, comedian and GLEE star Kevin McHale hosted The Orange Party, with performances from fellow GLEE star Alex Newell, a silent auction, and heartfelt speeches from our San Diego Ambassadors. The philanthropic month was capped off with a $10,000 check presentation from Sir Ivan, pop-dance recording artist and founder of The Peaceman Foundation. Sir Ivan has been a generous supporter of The Trevor Project since 2011, and with his newest donation and partnership, we aim to strengthen our services to the transgender community in particular.

You too can join our community of donors by participating in Giving Tuesday, the global day dedicated to giving back. This day is particularly important to The Trevor Project because during the holidays, LGBTQ youth need our services more than ever. By December 1, we hope to eventually reach 1,000 youth in crisis with the help of $1,000 donors. $25 can make a difference in one young person’s life. To give back to our life-saving work, please consider forming your own fundraising page for The Trevor Project or making a one-time donation and encouraging your community to participate in helping save young LGBTQ lives.

Another way to celebrate your support of our work is to join us at Fall Fete in New York Nov. 13, honoring Meghan McCain, with performances by The Haus of Mimosa, DJ Tracy Young, and The Lesbian and Gay Apple Corps. Marching Band. Then, on December 6 in Los Angeles, join us at TrevorLIVE for an irreverent night of comedy, music, and heartfelt speeches that will engage guests philanthropically. We thank you for making our work possible, and for giving a brighter future to LGBTQ youth.