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Making LGBTQ+ History Happen

This LGBTQ+ History Month, we’re remembering past trailblazers like Marsha P. Johnson, Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, Harvey Milk, and more, but we’re also looking forward to making more history. In a time of increased hostility toward LGBTQ+ people, and with anti-LGBTQ+ legislation still on the rise, the need for liberation is now. And when it comes to LGBTQ+ young people, their mental health is paying the price: 71% of LGBTQ+ youth — including 86% of trans and nonbinary youth — say state laws restricting the rights of LGBTQ+ young people have negatively impacted their mental health. They deserve to see a…
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Coming Out Stories from Our Community

For Coming Out Day, we asked our community and LGBTQ young people about their coming out stories. What they shared proves that coming out is different from person to person, and that no matter what, everyone deserves to come out how and if they want. Share your coming out story: When I first came out to my mom, she said "omg me too!" and the same thing happened with my best friend. I wrote a letter to my mom and left to go to my friend's house, and told her to call me once she read it :) I just…
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Allies Help Make LGBTQ+ History Happen

Ask any LGBTQ+ person, or any person for that matter, about the impact of an affirming adult on their life, and you will likely get more than a name. You’ll get a story. In a Trevor Project meeting last week, we did exactly that. We went around and shared the impact of allies in our lives when we were young. Some of the answers made us laugh and some moved us close to tears. Everyone at Trevor vividly recounted someone — a parent, a coach, a friend’s parent (and a disproportionate amount of English, drama, and art teachers) — whose support…
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The Value of Queer Latinx Joy

Written by Sue Cardenas-Soto (they/them), Copywriter National Latinx Heritage Month isn’t just a time to celebrate the histories and accomplishments of Latinx people — it’s also about learning about their struggles, their joys, and breaking down the barriers they face.  I can’t write about this without naming where my family is from, which intimately informs who I am. My dad is from and lives in Mexico City. My mom’s parents were Cuban refugees and missionaries who traveled across Latin America (Ecuador, Venezuela, El Salvador) before coming to the United States. My abuelo was a near-perfect archetype of a Cuban patriarch:…
Waist high picture of Selina Peña wearing a white shirt and black vest.
Blog

Allyship In The Classroom With Selina Peña

For Selina Peña (she/they), queer Chicanx educator and content creator, school has always been a refuge. She teaches at the very high school she graduated from, a school that provided a safe haven from her home environment. “Growing up in a bordertown, I took on various roles, including translator and caretaker,” Selina explained. “Now, as a queer Latina high school teacher in south Texas, I'm committed to fostering an inclusive and empowering classroom. I am aware of the value of representation in school and how it affects students' sense of identity and self-worth. I work hard to make sure my…
Sexual Orientation

Trevor’s Bi Staff Commemorate Bi Awareness Week

By: Gabriella Potter (they/them), Crisis Services Digital Supervisor In my work as a Crisis Services Digital Supervisor at The Trevor Project, I hear from young bi people everyday about the challenges and fears they face because of the stigma around bisexuality. That’s why we created, “How To Support Bisexual Youth: Ways to Care for Young People Who Are Attracted to More Than One Gender.” We know how important it is to provide resources for those who want to support the bi young people in their lives, as well as affirm and uplift bisexuality as a valid identity for bi young…
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Community

The Trevor Project Statement on Black Lives Matter

The Trevor Project believes unequivocally that Black Lives Matter and that we need to actively work to end systemic racism. It demeans the dignity of all of us to see some of us treated unjustly and inhumanely. LGBTQ people have an obligation to stand in solidarity with the Black community. That’s not just because Black people—and specifically Black trans people—were among those in the vanguard of fighting for LGBTQ equality at Compton’s Cafeteria, Stonewall, and many other places. And that’s not just because many people in the LGBTQ community are Black. Instead, LGBTQ people have a special obligation to stand…